All My Relations Arts | Call for Artists
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Call for Artists

 

Bring Her Home:

Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island

 

On View: February 2nd – April 10th, 2018

 

Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

All My Relations Arts and the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center invite you to participate in the group exhibition. All indigenous artists residing in Turtle Island are welcome to apply. All works must be original and can be 2D, 3D, video, performance, or installation.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:

 

Bring Her Home: Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island will highlight the ongoing epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, as well respond to the increased level of human trafficking during Super Bowl LII, which will be held in Minneapolis, MN on February 4, 2018.

 

This national exhibition will feature 14 selected Native artists of the United States. Half of the artists selected will represent the upper Midwest region: Minnesota, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin. The selected artists will be chosen by guest curator – Angela Two Stars, and curator coach – Karen Goulet, based upon the following criteria:

 

  • Strength of the work focusing on artistic merit.

  • Strength of the work addressing the exhibition topic.

  • Diverse representation of mediums.

  • Diverse representation of emerging to established artists.

 

 

 

 

**Please be aware this exhibition has the potential to trigger trauma in our artists & audience.**

 

 

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

When Native women go missing, they are very likely to be dead,” according to Indian Country Today1. The families are left feeling worried, scared, helpless, and resonate the plea: “We just want to know where she is. We just want to bring her home.” All My Relations Arts is asking you to respond to this plea. Prompts to consider for your submitted artwork:

 

  • What does it mean to be missing?

  • How are the families and loved ones affected and how do we create sanctuary, recovery, and healing?

  • What are your thoughts on awareness and prevention of Missing, Murdered, and the Human Trafficking of Indigenous Women and Girls and what must be done to turn the tide on this epidemic social ill?

  • The plea, “…we just want to bring her home…” addresses two potential outcomes: the enduring hope that the missing woman is found alive, and the grief and agony in the closure that comes from the murdered brought home. What are your thoughts on this complexity of emotions?

 

For additional readings to inform your work, the following links are suggested:

 

Missing and Murdered: No One Knows How Many Native Women Have Disappeared 1

 

Heitkamp Introduces Savanna’s Act to Help Address Crisis of Missing and Murdered Native American Women

 

Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the Criminal Justice Response: What is Known

 

Native American Women Are Being Sold into the Sex Trade on Ships Along Lake Superior

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR: Angela Two Stars

 

Angela Two Stars (Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux) is a public artist, illustrator, and educator. She received her BFA from Kendall College of Art and Design in 2017. Activism plays a recurring role in Angela’s work. From language revitalization to social issues, Angela utilizes the power of art to create positive change and raise awareness to contemporary issues that are important to her.

 

“In my first guest curatorial role, I am drawing on personal experience related to the topic of missing and murdered Indigenous women. My story is only one of many… I was nine years old when my Grandma disappeared. I remember how my family searched for her for months. I remember my Dad randomly pulling the car over to walk out into the woods to look for her body, while my Mom, my siblings, and I waited anxiously in the car. I remember being scared that he would find her. I remember when her body was found, and the horrific way in which she died. I don’t want that to be the only thing I remember about her… I want to remember how much she loved bingo, how she smoked like a chimney, and always drank coffee. I want to hear stories from her kids and grandkids of their favorite memories of her. I don’t want her to lose her identity to the violent act that took her life.” – Angela

 

The exhibition, Bring Her Home: Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island, looks at reclaiming the identity of the missing or murdered indigenous women, who over time are reduced to a statistic. Instead of this static fate, we choose to honor the life of the woman that was a sister, a wife, a mother, a best friend, a cousin, or a daughter.

 

Advocating for change, this epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women affects us directly or indirectly, and we all have a shared responsibility to work towards solutions.

 

ABOUT THE DIGITAL ORGANIZER: Moira Villiard

 

Moira Villiard grew up on the Fond du Lac Reservation and is a visual artist, community organizer, and designer based in Duluth, Minnesota where she is also employed as the Arts & Cultural Program Coordinator at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO). On top of program administration, she works directly with victims of trafficking and domestic violence at the women’s shelter as an advocate and activities coordinator.

 

“This issue is close to my heart as I get to know more and more women who pass through our shelter and back into the landscape of “everyday” life (at the grocery store, in passing on the street, etc.). Working on this project allows me another opportunity to help push the topics of trafficking, violence, and murdered and missing indigenous women closer to the forefront of community and mainstream dialogues, where, in open air, healing can ensue.” – Moira

 

ABOUT THE GALLERY:

 

All My Relations Arts (AMRA) operates the All My Relations Gallery, Minnesota’s premiere American Indian owned and operated contemporary fine arts gallery.  Situated on Franklin Avenue in Minneapolis, the gallery resides within the heart of the American Indian Cultural Corridor.  AMRA presents 4-6 fine art exhibits throughout the year, as well as hosting tours, presentations, and programs.  The focus of AMRA is to provide the people of the Twin Cities, greater Minnesota, and beyond consistently high-quality exposure to Native American fine arts.  As an initiative of the Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI), All My Relations Arts serves a very distinct role in NACDI’s community development work, providing the public with education about American Indian history, culture, and contemporary experiences through the arts.

 

ABOUT OUR PARTNER

 

Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC) is supporting the exhibition in partnership with All My Relations Arts. The mission of the MIWRC is to empower American Indian women and families to exercise their cultural values and integrity and to achieve sustainable life ways while advocating for justice and equity.

 

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

 

To be considered for participation in Bring Her Home: Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island please submit the following form. Artists who submit by November 30th, 2017 will be given priority.

 

Should your work samples fail to upload please send them via google drive or dropbox link to eday@nacdi.org.

 

For questions about the gallery contact: eday@nacdi.org

 

For questions about artist requirements contact: angelatwostars@gmail.com

 

For all media-related questions contact: tpayer@nacdi.org or (701) 278-5754

Download PDF version of the application here:

Call for Artists_Bring Her Home

 

 

 

 

 

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