All My Relations Arts | Call For Art Bring Her Home: Sacred Womxn of Resistance
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Call For Art Bring Her Home: Sacred Womxn of Resistance

CALL FOR ARTISTS

Bring Her Home: Sacred Womxn of Resistance

May 5th, 2020 – July 5th, 2020

Minneapolis, Minnesota

All My Relations Arts and the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center invite you to participate in the 2020 juried group exhibition, Bring Her Home: Sacred Womxn of Resistance. All indigenous artists residing in Turtle Island are welcome to apply, with preference given to work created by indigenous womxn, two-spirit, trans, and gender non-conforming artists. All works must be original and can be 2D, 3D, video, performance, or installation.

“A nation is not conquered until the hearts of its women are on the ground.”

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:

Bring Her Home: Sacred Womxn of Resistance will showcase contemporary expressions of indigenous resistance in response to the colonial foundations of the MMIW epidemic. This exhibit is intended to give voice to those most affected by this structural violence, which is why the majority of the work will be created by indigenous womxn, trans, two-spirit, and gender non-conforming artists. These artists have the unique and powerful ability to share personal narrative as a means to create counter dialogues in response to the colonial roots of this crisis. The work in this exhibit will have the capacity to build upon the ways in which we talk about the MMIW epidemic, while empowering our communities and honoring the long-standing tradition of indigenous resistance.

 

This juried National Call for Art will showcase 20 indigenous artists from across the United States. Of these 20 artists, 8 will be featured. The 12 selected artists will be chosen by the guest curator–Reyna Hernandez and curator coach–Angela Two Stars, based upon the following criteria:

 

  1. Strength of the work focusing on artistic merit.
  2. Strength of the work addressing the exhibition topic.
  3. Diverse representation of mediums.
  4. Diverse representation of emerging to established artists.

 

It is highly encouraged that work created for this exhibit be an empowered response to the colonial/structural roots of the MMIW epidemic. 

 

***Examples of colonial/structural violence can include (but are not limited to) any of the following:

 

    • Patriarchy (i.e. gender binary, rigid & imposed gender roles)
    • Misrepresentations of Indigenous People & Cultures (i.e. stereotype, mascots)
  • Political Agendas (i.e. legislative loopholes, treaties, tribal vs. federal jurisdiction)
  • Capitalism (i.e. oil industry, man camps)
  • Inaccurate Data/Misunderstanding of MMIW (who this is affecting)
  • Work that touches on any of these examples should be framed by the immense power that is derived from challenging these structural strategies through creative expression and indigenous resistance. 
  • Please be aware this exhibition has the potential to trigger trauma in our artists & audience.

 

Questions to Consider: 

  1. What does it mean to be an indigenous womxn?
  2. What do you believe is the best way to honor MMIW, and how can artists respond to this epidemic in a respectful and effective way?
  3. How can art effectively confront the colonial power structures that have contributed to the violence committed against our indigenous womxn, two-spirit, trans, and gender non-conforming communities?
  4. In what ways can creative expression help shift misperceptions surrounding victims of abuse related to MMIW?  How can indigenous womxn challenge these inaccuracies to reclaim bodily integrity?
  5. How is resistance created through art and how can we exercise power through our expression?

 

For additional readings to inform your work, the following links are suggested:

NOT MURDERED, NOT MISSING: REBELLING AGAINST COLONIAL GENDER VIOLENCE- Leanne Betasamasoke Simpson

https://www.leannesimpson.ca/writings/not-murdered-not-missing-rebelling-against-colonial-gender-violence

 

WHY GENDER IS SUCH A CRITICAL PART OF THE NATIONAL MMIW INQUIRY– Tara Williamson

https://www.cbc.ca/2017/why-gender-is-such-a-critical-part-of-the-national-mmiw-inquiry-1.4013949

 

RETHINKING GENDER AND SEXUALITY: A CASE STUDY OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN “TWO SPIRIT” PEOPLE- Zuleka Zuvallos

https://othersociologist.com/2013/09/09/two-spirit-people/

 

ELIMINATION AND RESPONSES TO VIOLENCE, EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE OF INDIGENOUS GIRLS, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG WOMEN- Inter-Agency Support Group on Indigenous People’s Issues

https://www.un.org/en/ga/69/meetings/indigenous/pdf/IASG%20Thematic%20Paper_%20Violence%20against%20Girls%20and%20Women%20-%20rev1.pdf

 

SEX, FOSSIL FUELS, AND MATRIARCHAL ECONOMICS- Winona Laduke

http://thecirclenews.org/environment/sex-fossil-fuels-and-matriarchal-economics/

 

MMIW- Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women

https://www.csvanw.org/mmiw/

INDIGENOUS RESISTANCE IS POST-APOCOLYPTIC- Nick Estes

https://www.dissentmagazine.org/online_articles/booked-indigenous-resistance-is-post-apocalyptic-with-nick-estes

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR: Reyna Hernandez

Reyna Hernandez is a Yankton Sioux Dakota artist working across disciplines to explore contemporary indigenous issues concerning the relationship between identity and the effects of epistemic/colonial violence, specifically within academia. Throughout her research, Reyna studies critical theorists who examine the consequences of intellectual colonialism, in order to dismantle prescribed modes of understanding indigenous people and cultures. Hernandez received her B.A in English and B.F.A in Studio Arts at the University of South Dakota in 2016, and is currently working on a community-based mural project in Vermillion, SD where she also lives and works.

“My hope for this exhibit is to highlight empowered work created by indigenous womxn, two-spirit, trans, and gender non-conforming artists. Hearing from the people who are directly targeted with this type of structural violence is an incredibly important and necessary step in understanding how we can challenge and resist this [seemingly] never-ending attempt to erase us. There is so much to learn from people who are often silenced and I wanted to create space for these perspectives to be heard and seen.

While I was researching for this exhibition, trying to figure out how to even begin approaching MMIW as an exhibition topic, I came across several people who are guiding this conversation in an extremely powerful direction through various artforms. The power in the work that these artists are responding with is (in part) due to its lack of concern of comfortability for those who aren’t personally impacted by this devastation. Identifying and dismantling the systems of power that keep some people comfortable, while others are oppressed, isn’t something that people who are in the positions of comfort, want to address; but that doesn’t mean that we have to remain silent about our very real and very serious concerns. We’re at a tipping point in the U.S. concerning the treatment of marginalized people, especially in regard to MMIW. It’s enough, and we’re ready to challenge the social and political barriers that keep this epidemic alive, even if it makes people uncomfortable.”

 

ABOUT THE CURATOR COACH: Angela Two Stars

Angela Two Stars (Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate) is the All My Relations Arts Director. She is the curator and creator of Bring Her Home: Stolen Daughters of Turtle Island which exhibited and traveled in two installments in 2018 and 2019. Angela is a public artist with work gracing the shores of Bde Maka Ska and her recent selection for the Walker Art Center’s Indigenous Arts Commission which will be installed in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden in the Fall of 2020.  She received her BFA from Kendall College of Art and Design in 2017 and currently lives in St. Paul with her husband and three children. Angela’s deep investment into the healing power of art and personal family tragedy drives the sensitivity and empathy required to bring this exhibition to the families and all those affected by this ongoing epidemic. 

 

PARTNERSHIPS

Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC). The mission of the MIWRC is to empower American Indian women and families to exercise their cultural values and integrity, and to achieve sustainable life ways, while advocating for justice and equity.

Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition, (MIWSAC) is a statewide tribal coalition with individual and program membership from across the state. Through unity we will strengthen our voices and build resources to create awareness and eliminate sexual violence against Indian women and children.

 

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Click here for the call for artists. 

Complete the following form and send along with 1-5 high-resolution digital images of your original artworks via Google Drive or Dropbox link to  Angela Two Stars of All My Relations Arts at AMRAExhibitions@nacdi.org by April 6th, 2020. Artists will be notified of selection on April 10th, 2020. 

 

DEADLINES & DATES

Submission Deadline…………………… April 6th, 2020

Notification of Status…………………… April 10th, 2020

Artwork Must Arrive in Gallery by.. April 24th, 2020

Opening Reception……………………… May 7th, 2020

On View……………………………………  May 5th – July 5th

***Additional artist events (artist talk, community workshops, etc.) TBA***

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