All My Relations Arts | Noojimo (She Heals)
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Noojimo (She Heals)

Image credit: Gizigos-Dakise (Ojibwe, your aunt is cool), Ne-Dah-Ness Rose Greene

Noojimo (She Heals) celebrates the importance of Aunties in Indigenous spaces. In many Indigenous communities, the Auntie serves as an extra parental role – one who provides mental, physical, and spiritual support to younger relatives. Though faced with discrimination and patriarchy, women continue to be protectors of family, culture, and Aki (earth), taking on roles as caretakers, leaders, cultivators, mentors, mediators, and innovators.


Curator, Hillary Kempenich, invites artists to center their work around the empowerment of Indigenous Aunties – how we were raised by them; how we honor their legacy; how we are them; how we make space for those who need us as Aunties; and how we respect one another.


Noojimo will be a powerful tribute to courageous women (both historically and modern) stepping into the role of Aunties; who influence, create, and strengthen bonds of obligation, trust, and solidarity both inside the home and community.

Participating artists:

Nedahness Rose Green
Tara Keanuenue Gumapac
Eve LaFountain
Tanaya Widner
Agnes Woodward
Sharon Day
Somah Haaland
Racquel Banaszak
Dyana DeCoteau-Dyess
Rayshele Kamke
Valaria Tatera
Deanna L Croaker
Teresa McDowell
Loriene Pearson
Rita Erdrich
Rick Kagigebi
Penny Kagigebi
Cynthia Hamilton
Melissa Widner
Nelson White

PROGRAMMING DATES
On View: July 19 – Sept. 17, 2022
Opening Reception: July 19, 6 – 8 pm
Curator’s Talk with Hillary Kempenich: August 11, 6:30 pm
Closing Reception and Artists Panel: Sept. 9, 6 – 8 pm

Click HERE for a Virtual Tour. VR Rendering by Tj Turner Pictures.

About the Exhibit: 

In many Indigenous communities, the Auntie serves as an extra parental role – one who provides mental, physical, and spiritual support to younger relatives. Though faced with discrimination and patriarchy, women continue to be protectors of family, culture, and Aki (earth), taking on roles as caretakers, leaders, cultivators, mentors, mediators, and innovators.

Kempenich, alongside curator coach, Heid E. Erdrich invited artists, via juried call, to center their work around the empowerment of Indigenous Aunties – how we were raised by them; how we honor their legacy; how we are them; how we make space for those who need us as Aunties; and how we respect one another though our personalities or lifestyles differ.

Noojimo will be a powerful tribute to courageous women stepping into the role of Aunties; who influence, create, and strengthen bonds of obligation, trust, and solidarity both inside the home and community.

About the Curator: 

Hillary Kempenich (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa) is a multi-disciplinary, award winning artist, cultural bearer, and advocate, emphasizing her work to empower Indigenous people. Hillary has immersed herself into sustaining her small business and continues her passion for community work. Raised on the Turtle Mountain reservation, Kempenich continues to advocate for better educational, health and cultural standards through her work in both urban and rural communities.

Hillary Kempenich is fluent in many mediums with a collaborative style influenced by her independent spirit as a creative woman and her deep connection to her heritage of Ojibwe, Cree, Assiniboine, Dakota, and French-Canadian ancestral roots. Memories, traditions, and stories are continually incorporated into Kempenich’s work to empower and honor Indigenous women, youth, and fellow LGBTQIA+ Two-Spirit peoples. Kempenich comes from a family of strong artist abilities, of which are strong influences within her work. While holding on to the ties to the Turtle Mountains, Kempenich works on developing her trades with her own personal style.

Hillary has a growing list of group and solo shows, collaborations, as well as receiving recognition nationwide. The beginning of Kempenich’s career was marked by awards from the National Indian Child Welfare Association, Native Arts Gathering and the First Peoples Fund. Hillary Kempenich received a second-place ribbon in the prestigious SWAIA’s Indian Market in 2018. Hillary’s artwork has recently been published in the “Finish the Fight!” a book written by New York Times author Veronica Chambers. “Finish the Fight!” are chronicles of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color suffragists, whose stories may have gone untold. Hillary’s work continues to be featured in private collections, museums, and galleries throughout the United States. The U.S. Department of Interior Museum and Secretary of Art has acquired the piece “Resilience: A Portrait of Zitkala-Sa,” in Washington, D.C. to be part of their permanent collection and catalog.

Hillary holds a bachelor’s degree from University of North Dakota. She serves on the Grand Forks Foundation for Education Alumni Network board of directors and the North Dakota Indian Business Alliance board of directors. Hillary also serves as an arts and cultural consultant and has started the wearable art line Zazegaa Designs by Hillary Kempenich. Hillary lives in Grand Forks, North Dakota with her family.

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